THOR’S CAVE

Just outside the village is the magnificent Thor’s Cave, a natural cavern set in a steep limestone crag, with its huge arched entrance easily visible (and quite accessible) from the footpath below.  Evidence has been found of human occupation of the cave during the Stone Age, with use well into the Iron Age and Roman period.

Thor’s Cave
Looking up at Thor’s Cave from below

The origin of the name is uncertain, possibly from the word “tor”. There are possible links with the Norse god Thor but evidence is lacking and the original name was Tor cave (a Tor being a rocky outcrop so would fit with the appearance of the cave).

In Norse mythologyThor (from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing and fertility.

 

Thor’s Cave
Thor’s Cave Entrance

Excavations in 1864–65 and 1927–35 found human and animal remains, stone tools, pottery, amber beads, and bronze items within Thor's Cave and the adjacent Thor's Fissure Cavern. The caves are estimated to have contained the burial sites of at least seven people. The finds suggest the cavern was occupied from the end of the Palaeolithic period, with more intensive use during the iron age and Roman periods.

Inside Thor’s Cave
Inside Thor’s Cave

I and Rachel parked up at Wetton Village Hall and walked the route to the Cave. The cave had a couple of abseilers in the mouth of the cave when we arrived, but rapidly a huge amount of people with dogs started arriving. My advice is get there really early, else don't bother.

Inside Thor’s Cave
Inside Thor’s Cave

GALLERY

Various images from Thor's Cave

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